RSSRecent Articles

CDI Week Cartoon Caption Contest

It is time for the CDI Week Photo/Cartoon Caption Contest. Post your (tasteful and respectful please) suggested captions for the following cartoon in the comments section and ACDIS Members Services Specialist Penny Richards will chose a favorite to win a prize.

Cartoon 6

Share your love of ACDIS: Refer a friend

Join ACDIS. Get the Journal. Get informed.

Join ACDIS. Get the Journal. Get informed.

As an ACDIS member, you’ve come to rely on the in-depth Forms and Tools Library, the quarterly CDI Journal, quarterly conference calls, and invaluable networking opportunities. Now it’s time your colleagues enjoyed these benefits too!

Now through September 30th, refer a colleague to ACDIS and receive 30% off your next book, newsletter, webcast, or video purchase on www.hcmarketplace.com.* The process is easy, and you’ll receive your discount regardless of whether or not your colleague joins!

*Upon submission of your referral, you’ll receive a discount code via email to use towards your next book, newsletter, webcast, or video purchase on www.hcmarketplace.com. This discount expires October 16, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. ET. Discount cannot be combined with any other offers.

Don’t just tell your colleagues about ACDIS, refer them!

CDI Week Photo Caption Contest

Here’s the next CDI Week Photo/Cartoon Caption Contest. Post your (tasteful and respectful please) suggested captions for the following photograph in the comments section and ACDIS Members Services Specialist Penny Richards will chose a favorite to win a prize.

 

Pic 6

CDI Week Photo Caption Contest

Here’s the next CDI Week Photo/Cartoon Caption Contest. Post your (tasteful and respectful please) suggested captions for the following photograph in the comments section and ACDIS Members Services Specialist Penny Richards will chose a favorite to win a prize. This one also comes from the 2014 ACDIS National Conference!

 

Pic 4-2

CDI Week Photo Caption Contest

It is time for the CDI Week Photo/Cartoon Caption Contest. Post your (tasteful and respectful please) suggested captions for the following photograph in the comments section and ACDIS Members Services Specialist Penny Richards will chose a favorite to win a prize. This one comes from the 2014 ACDIS Conference in Las Vegas!
Pic 5-2

CDI Week Cartoon Caption Contest

It is time for the CDI Week Photo/Cartoon Caption Contest. Post your (tasteful and respectful please) suggested captions for the following cartoon in the comments section and ACDIS Members Services Specialist Penny Richards will chose a favorite to win a prize.

 

Cartoon DRGs

Free Optum webcast rescheduled for CDI Week; additional free webinar on PSI and CDI offered

Join us this for these free audioconference/webinars

Join us this for these free audio conference/ webinars.

Natural language processing (NLP), an emerging technology for CDI professionals, can help drive clinically relevant queries and optimize physician engagement in your CDI program. Learn how Optum360™ case finding technology, powered by LifeCode® NLP technology, can transform your CDI program during this free one-hour webinar on September 17, 1 to 2 p.m. ET.

Join Kelly Gates, RN, MHA, CCDS, and Tom Darr, MD, as they showcase the “next generation” of CDI software, expanding on how technology can perform checks and balances between documented diagnoses and clinical indicators. This enables CDI specialists to quickly and efficiently review potential query opportunities. Clinical indicators identified by the technology route to the CDI specialist for review, and are automatically included in the physician query. These new tools optimize manual tasks, and result in improved response and adoption by physicians.

Click here to learn more about this webcast.

In addition, to kick off CDI Week, ACDIS is offering a 60-minute free webcast on Tuesday, September 16, at 1 p.m. (ET) regarding the role of CDI specialists in review of Patient Safety Indicators (PSI) on a concurrent basis. Join Cheryl Ericson, MS, RN, CCDS, CDIP, AHIMA-Approved ICD-10-CM/PCS Trainer, as she explains PSIs and their function as well as the CDI specialists’ role in their review. The program will also take a deeper dive into PSI 90 to help CDIs focus on the required documentation elements in the medical record and provide practical tips for working in conjunction with quality.

If you have any questions, please contact our customer service department at customerservice@hcpro.com or call 800-650-6787.

TBT: CDI input helps EHR implementation succeed

Learn how new technologies will affect CDI efforts in this week's free webinar.

CDI involvement in EHR implementation is key.

Editor’s Note: In social media memes Throw-back Thursday generally means sharing an old high school photo, something you wish had been left unpublished–like your 80s bouffant or 70s bell bottoms. We thought we’d pick up on the theme and occasionally go back into our CDI archives to highlight some salient CDI tid-bit. This week’s installment comes from the April 2012 edition of the CDI Journal.

“We saw the EHR train as it was whisking by. We were shouting ‘Wait! Wait! What about CDI?’ ” says one CDI specialist. “They didn’t know CDI existed. The [implementation team] hadn’t thought about us and how we interact with the record or what we might need from an electronic system. So now we’re trying to play catch-up and do the best we can with what we’ve got.”
CDI specialists probably think phrases like “interoperability” and “meaningful use” need not cross their minds—EHR implementation belongs in the hands of the IT or HIM department, right? The answer to that question is yes and no, says Barbara Hinkle-Azzara, RHIA, (formerly) Vice President of Operations for Meta Health Technology in New York City. The individual end-user (i.e., the CDI specialist reviewing medical records on the hospital floor) “may not need to be involved in ‘checking off the boxes’ to certify meaningful use is met, but certainly adapting to an EHR and adhering to meaningful use requirements affects the information CDI professionals review and how they will ultimately perform their jobs.
“EHR systems will change the CDI specialists’ experience,” she says.
A CDI program director or physician champion can play a pivotal role in the implementation of initial and ongoing assessment efforts for EHRs and their components, says John Pettine, MD, FACP, CCDS, CDI director at Lehigh (PA) Valley Health Network.
“CDI staff should get involved and do it now before it is too late. Otherwise, CDI professionals are at the mercy of decisions made without their input, which can be tragic to the success of the program going forward into ICD-10,” he says.

Certified Clinical Documentation Specialist (CCDS) Credential Reminders

How many professionals from your state hold the CCDS certification?

Be sure to take note of your recertification due date.

The following changes will take effect on October 1, 2014:

1. Exam eligibility period will change from one year to 120 days (four months) in which to schedule and take the exam

Candidates will have 120 days (four months) to schedule and take their CCDS exam. Once the application is approved, ACDIS submits the candidate’s names to the exam company. The exam company emails (and mails) the candidate’s scheduling instructions. The candidate is responsible for scheduling his or her exam at a location and date convenient to him or her.

Note: Presently, candidates have a one-year window in which to take the exam. Any candidate sent to the exam company prior to October 1, 2014, will be grandfathered into the one-year eligibility window.

Candidates who do not take their exam within the eligibility period forfeit their exam fee and must reapply.

2. Re-exam fee will change from $100 to $125.

This fee is applicable for a one-time only re-exam for a candidate who fails on his or her first attempt. It also applies to candidates who are absent from their scheduled exam. ACDIS is charged by its testing company for every scheduled exam. Candidates may change their scheduled testing date one time with no fee, and must do so by contacting the exam company at least two business days prior to their scheduled testing appointment.

3. Fees implemented for replacement certificates and lapel pins

Replacements for certificates and pins damaged in transit will be provided at no cost. ACDIS will assess a fee of $25 each for other replacement requests for certificates and lapel pins. The fee is payable by check or credit card at the time of the request.

All replacement orders and payment instructions should be sent to: ACDIS CCDS Administrator, 75 Sylvan Street #A101, Danvers MA 01923 Email: prichards@hcpro.com; Fax: 781-639-5542

Reminder: Your CCDS re-certification is due by the two-year anniversary of the date you passed the exam. There is no current plan to restructure the CCDS re-certification requirements to include any specific number or level of ICD-10-related continuing education units. You may re-certify at your convenience and if you need more time, there is a 45-day grace period.

For example if you passed the CCDS exam on Sept. 1, 2014, you need to re-certify by Sept. 1, 2016. Using the 45-day grace period, it will be due no later than November 15, 2016. To re-certify, you need to submit continuing education credits earned during the two year period that you held the CCDS certification (so, from Sept. 1, 2014 to Sept. 1, 2016).

When you are ready to renew, complete the re-certification application, and send it, along with proof of CEUs and the applicable fee, to the address on the application (mail, fax, or email). The application is available on the ACDIS website.

We send several courtesy email notices as your renew date approaches, but you may not hear from us if we don’t have your correct email address or if our notices are blocked on your end. Make note of when your recert due date (your original exam date is on your certificate and on the score sheet you got when you took the exam). It is your responsibility to know when you recertification is due. If you’re not sure of your exam date, drop me an email and I’ll look it up.

Searching for agreement with ICD-10 code assignment

Don't let physician education become a tug of war at your facility.

ICD-10 reconciliation should be a learning process. Start now.

The ICD-10 transition has been nothing if not contentious. We’ve had delays mandated by both CMS and Congress, as well as ongoing attempts by the AMA to kill ICD-10 altogether.

Another discordant note is a lack of coder agreement. Not on the merits of ICD-10, but on which codes to assign.

Both 3M’s Donna Smith, RHIA, and AHIMA’s Angie Comfort, RHIA, CDIP, CCS, say determining the correct code isn’t a sure thing. Coders aren’t always ending up at the same code. Why?

Well, first of all, the system isn’t live so no one is really coding in it, so there is still some guess work involved.

Second, physician documentation is not where we need it to be even for ICD-9.

Third, not everyone is finding the same information in the record. In many cases physicians already document laterality, Smith says; it’s just that coders might not know where to look for it.

Fourth, we still don’t have a ton of guidance for the grey areas. We have 30 years’ worth of Coding Clinic advice for ICD-9. We have a few issues for ICD-10.

Many organizations are doing some type of dual or double coding but how many actually check to make sure coders come up with the correct answer? That’s  another problem: How do you decide who got the correct answer?

You need a plan, Smith says. Part of which should include identifying the top diagnoses and procedures at your organization. Pull actual cases that include those conditions or procedures and have all of your coders code the record.

Once you’ve done that, compare the results, Comfort says. Did you all come up with the same answer? Probably not.

Agreement rates are pretty low right now, according to Smith. So you came up with one code and your coworker came up with a different one. Maybe a third coworker came up with something completely different. Now what?

Sit down and talk about it, both Comfort and Smith say. No one knows everything about ICD-10 yet (no one knows everything about ICD-9 either and it’s been around way longer). Try to figure out why you came up with different codes. Did someone miss a piece of information in the documentation? Did someone make an assumption based on his or her knowledge of the physician’s habits? Is the physician’s documentation so vague that everyone was just guessing?

If you can’t come to an agreement among yourselves, ask Coding Clinic. Send the de-identified record to AHA and ask them how to code it. Coding Clinic loves real-life examples, Smith says. So send them in. The more actual documentation they can look at, the better they can answer questions for everyone.

Editor’s note: This article is an excerpt from the ICD-10 Trainer Blog. Join ACDIS/HCPro tomorrow, Wednesday Sept. 10 for Dual Coding/CDI: Practical Steps to Advance your Facility’s ICD-10-CM/PCS Readiness.