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ECRI Introduces HIT-based Patient Identification Tools

The toolkit aims to prevent patient misidentification through the use of health information technology.

Patient misidentification is a big and likely underreported problem for hospitals and health systems, as well as for patients.

The consequences can be significant. ECRI Institute research shows that 9% of patient misidentification events lead to temporary or permanent harm or death.

That’s why the ECRI Institute and a stakeholder collaborative it convened, the Partnership for Health IT Patient Safety, has launched a new patient identification resource to help prevent patient misidentification through the use of health information technology.

ECRI is a Pennsylvania-based nonprofit that works to improve the safety, quality, and cost-effectiveness of patient care.

The toolkit divides its recommendations into two sections:

  1. Attributes addresses “the information-gathering aspects of patient identification, including the fields and the formats that are available to accommodate acquisition of required information.”
  2. Technology addresses “new technologies to improve identification and ways to leverage existing technologies for safe patient identification.”

Continue reading at HealthLeaders Media. 

ECRI: Top patient safety concerns of 2017

TheECRI INSTITUTE LOGO ECRI Institute has published its 2017 list of top patient safety hazards and concerns. The Institute publishes the list to highlight and educate healthcare workers on various dangers affecting patients. The list includes guidance on how to effectively respond to these concerns, along with implementing priorities and corrective action plans. This year the list includes:

1.    Information Management in electronic health records (EHR)
2.    Unrecognized patient deterioration (UPD)
3.    Implementation and use of clinical decision support
4.    Test result reporting and follow-up
5.    Antimicrobial stewardship
6.    Patient identification
7.    Opioid administration and monitoring in acute care
8.    Behavioral health issues in non-behavioral-health settings
9.    Management of new oral anticoagulants
10.  Inadequate organization systems or processes to improve safety and quality

“The 10 patient safety concerns listed in our report are very real,” Catherine Pusey, RN, ECRI associate director told HealthLeaders. “They are causing harm (often serious harm) to real people.”

The proper use and timely access to EHRs for patient information management was the main concern this year, Lorraine B. Possanza, program director for ECRI’s Partnership for Health IT Patient Safety said in a press release. She says the vast storehouses of patient data now available to physicians have created new challenges.

“The object is still for people to have the information that they need to make the best clinical decision,” she wrote. “Health information needs to be clear, accurate, up-to-date, readily available, and easily accessible.”

The second concern, UPD, has recently been the subject of increased training, education, better clinical protocols, and public awareness campaigns. However, despite faster recognition and response, UPD is still a major concern.

“People have seen how well the campaigns have worked for stroke and STEMI and how much they’ve improved outcomes,” Patricia N. Neumann, RN, ECRI senior patient safety analyst and consultant told HealthLeaders. “What if those same principles could be applied to other conditions that require fast recognition and management? We could have a big impact on improving outcomes.”

Read more at HealthLeaders Media

Top medical device errors

Hi blog readers,

Although this posting isn’t specifically accreditation-related, I thought you might find the ECRI’s list of top 10 medical device hazards of 2008. The list is as follows:

  • Alarm hazards
  • Needlesticks and other sharps injuries
  • Air embolism from contrast media injectors
  • Retained devices and fragments left in patients
  • Surgical fires
  • Anesthesia hazards related to poor equipment inspection prior to use
  • Misleading displays on equipment
  • High radiation levels associated with CT scan
  • MRI burns
  • Fiberoptic light-source burns, usually from endoscopes, retractors, and head lamps


This year’s list differed from last years in that five new hazards were added. The ECRI institute does not want hospital staff members to think that those hazards left off the list this year are no longer problems–instead the institute felt that they should highlight some new concerns this year. Last year’s list also included burns during electrosurgery, caster failures, infusion pump programming errors, misconnection of blood pressure monitors to IV lines, and radiation therapy errors.

Do you see these hazards occurring in your facilities? How have you tried to make sure they don’t occur?

To read the ECRI Institute’s full report, click here.