RSSAll Entries in the "Joint Commission Changes" Category

Joint Commission updates LS, EC chapters

Three revisions to The Joint Commission’s Life Safety and Environment of Care chapters will go into effect on March 11. The respective changes add more clarity to requirements regarding non-rated doors, environmental features of anesthetics areas, corridor door latch. However, not all changes apply to all the same programs, so you should check to see which ones impact you. The changes are intended to improve alignment with CMS regulations. You can find the prepublication standards below:

•    Ambulatory Health Care
•    Behavioral Health Care
•    Critical Access Hospital
•    Hospital
•    Nursing Care Center
•    Office-Based Surgery
•    Home Care

Joint Commission to roll out new maternal care and infectious disease requirements

On July 1, 2018, The Joint Commission will implement three new elements of performance (EP.) The EPs are intended to reduce the risk of diseases like HIV and syphilis being passed from mother to child during birth. The accreditor made the announcement in the latest R3 Report, with the aim of protecting both the mother and child from harm.

“The requirements will help improve maternal and neonatal health in Joint Commission accredited hospitals and critical access hospitals across the country,” Kathy Clark, MSN, RN, Joint Commission associate project director specialist, Division of Health Care Quality Evaluation, said in a press release. “If left undiagnosed or untreated, infectious diseases can be extremely dangerous and even life-threatening, so it is critical that testing and treatment for both the woman and baby is completed according to clinical practice guidelines.”

The EPs require providers to test pregnant women for certain diseases that could be transmitted to the child during birth: HIV, hepatitis B, group B streptococcus and syphilis. The results are then documented in the patient’s medical record for providers to act upon.

CMS and Joint Commission change hospital eligibility requirements

Both organizations have changed their expectations on the defintion of a hospital. CMS’s new S&C Memo 17-44-Hospitals says that surveyors will use average daily census (ADC) and average length of stay (ALOS) data to determine if the hospital is primarily engaged in providing services to inpatients, and “a hospital must have inpatients at the time of survey in order for surveyors to directly observe the actual provision of care and services to patients, and the effects of that care” to determine if the facility is meeting the Conditions of Participation (CoP) in Medicare.

In addition, both CMS and The Joint Commission say that hospitals will need at least two active inpatients on site for an accreditation survey to be done. This change is effective immediately.

2018 version of “Patient Safety Systems” Chapter available

The Joint Commission has released the most recent versions of it’s PS Chapter for hospitals, nursing care centers, critical access hospitals, behavioral healthcare centers, laboratories, and more.

Joint Commission announces four survey focus areas

Representatives from The Joint Commission, URAC, DNV-GL, the Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP), and National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) took the stage at the 2017 NAMSS Educational Conference & Exhibition to share what they have learned from this year’s accreditation surveys and to tell audience members about relevant standards changes

The Joint Commission announced four areas of focus:

1.    The SAFER Matrix: Implemented in January 2017, the SAFER Matrix has nine boxes that measure the likelihood to harm a patient on one axis and scope of occurrence (limited, pattern, widespread) on the other.

2.    Antimicrobial stewardship: The CDC reported that 20% to 50% of antibiotics were prescribed unnecessarily or inappropriately annually. Medical staffs must reduce their antimicrobial use and have a medical staff process to demonstrate an effective use of antibiotics or antimicrobials in their organizations.

3.    Ligature risks for behavioral healthcare units: Due to the increasing rise of inpatient suicides (1,200 to 1,500 each year), 70% of which are by hanging, ligature risks are no longer acceptable in areas specified for the treatment of behavioral healthcare patients with suicide risk.

4.    Culture of safety:Leaders must ensure a culture of safety and identify areas to improve culture of safety. Staff must be comfortable and able to report issues of safety to leadership. This is already a culture of safety standard in the Leadership chapter and the accreditor will unveil a related standard in the Medical Staff chapter in 2018.

According to Louis Goolsby, MD, FACOG, FACHE, the most common citations from the Medical Staff chapter still come from MS.01.01.01, specifically EP3 (specific requirements and associated details are included in the medical staff bylaws) and EP5 (the medical staff complies with the medical staff bylaws). Another common citation is MS.03.01.01 (practitioners only practice within their scope of privileges).

Editor’s note: 
The following article was originally published on the Credentialing Resource Center, October 24, 2017.

West Virginia cities sue Joint Commission over alleged role in opioid crisis

Four West Virginia cities and towns filed a class-action lawsuit against The Joint Commission and Joint Commission Resources on November 2, claiming the accreditor “grossly misrepresented the addictive qualities of opioids” in their pain management standards. The town of Ceredo and cities of Charleston, Huntington, and Kenova claim that those standards forced hospitals to prescribe unsafe amounts of painkillers, fueling addiction and deaths in the state. [Is there any dollar amount named in the lawsuit? What is it asking for?]

“This lawsuit is a critical move toward eliminating the source of opioid addiction and holding one of the most culpable parties responsible,” said Huntington Mayor Steve Williams. “For too long, [The Joint Commission] has operated in concert with opioid producers to establish pain management guidelines that feature the use of opioids virtually without restriction. The [commission’s] standards are based on bad science, if they are based on any science at all.”

West Virginia has the highest drug overdose death rate in the nation, with 41.5 deaths per 100,000 in 2015. Huntington and Cabell County had the highest overdose fatality rate in the state last year.

The lawsuit claims that the pharmaceutical companies like Purdue Pharma (the makers of OxyContin) worked with The Joint Commission to create the pain management standards. These companies stood to gain from the overuse of their drugs, the lawsuit claims.

The Joint Commission accredits at least 10 hospitals and healthcare facilities in Charleston and Huntington, and other cities and towns are expected to join the federal lawsuit.

The Joint Commission updated its pain management standards in June to reduce over prescriptions, which will take effect on January 1. However, the lawsuit says the accreditor waited too long to make those changes.

This isn’t the first time that The Joint Commission has come under fire either. In 2016 more than 60 medical experts and nonprofit organizations signed petitions asking the commission to change its standards. Claiming they “foster dangerous pain control practices, the endpoint of which is often the inappropriate provision of opioids with disastrous adverse consequences for individuals, families, and communities.”

Joint Commission: screening for violence

In the October edition of Perspectives, The Joint Commission reiterated the need to screen patients for potential risks to themselves or others. This is part of a long-standing and ongoing effort to change the sky-high rates of workplace violence in healthcare.

More than 70% of the 23,000 significant injuries resulting from workplace assault in 2013 happened in healthcare and social service settings, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The settings with the highest rates of workplace violence are emergency departments, behavioral healthcare settings, extended care facilities, and inpatient psychiatric units.

After reviewing 145 sentinel events between 2013 and 2015, The Joint Commission wrote that a common cause of violence was an inadequate behavioral health assessment of patients to identify aggressive tendencies. Sometimes, these assessments weren’t done at all, and the results ranged from assault to rape and even death.

“In order to accurately assess the needs of an individual for care planning, it is important to collect data about the individual’s past emotional and behavioral functioning, to assess his/her current needs and goals, and to analyze the data collected in order to develop a plan of care, treatment, or services that effectively addresses the risk of harm to self or others,” The Joint Commission writes. “These steps are also important to determine if there is a need to collect additional information.”

This includes checking to see if the patient has a history of violent behavior. If so, is there anything in their record that could determine if they’ll repeat their actions?

“If there is a history of aggression, or if the individual is admitted in an agitated state, staff should be alerted and the preliminary plan of care, treatment, or services should address the interventions required to maintain the safety of the individual and others,” “…the Perspectives article continued. “Interventions in the preliminary plan of care would likely include close supervision and monitoring of the individual, individualized de-escalation strategies, and adjustments to the environment of care as needed.”

Here are some other free resources and training on workplace violence prevention:

1.    Workplace Violence Prevention Resources for Health Care Portal (www.jointcommission.org/workplace_violence.aspx)    
2.    OSHA’s Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence in Healthcare and Social Services (www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3148.pdf)
3.    OSHA’s Preventing Workplace Violence: A Road Map for Healthcare Facilities (www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3827.pdf)
4.    The Center for Health Design’s Safety Risk Assessment Toolkit
(www.goo.gl/eH9IbG)
5.    The CDC’s Workplace Violence Prevention for Nurses course (www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/violence/training_nurses.html)
6.    The Emergency Nurses Association’s Workplace Violence Toolkit
(www.goo.gl/0GXblW)
7.    ASIS International’s Managing Disruptive Behavior and Workplace Violence in Healthcare
(www.goo.gl/MDGsrf)

Joint Commission updates EM standards to match CMS

In response to CMS’ final emergency preparedness rule issued earlier this month, The Joint Commission announced revisions to its emergency management (EM) standards. CMS is expected to approve the updated standards before they go into effect on November 15.

Accredited organizations can access the proposed drafts on their Joint Commission Connect™ extranet site, with more information on the way.

The Joint Commission’s standards come with new Elements of Performance on the following topics:

•    Continuity of operations and succession plans
•    Documentation of collaboration with local, tribal, regional, state and federal emergency management officials
•    Contact information on volunteers and tribal groups
•    Annual training of all new or existing staff, contractors, and volunteers
•    Integrated healthcare systems
•    Transplant hospitals

Several of the new requirements merely provide more specifics on what The Joint Commission already expects. This includes including documentation for existing practices and annual training for staff.

CMS first announced the emergency preparedness CoPs in September 2016, compelling hospitals to communicate and coordinate their emergency plans with other hospitals and government agencies.

They also require regular emergency preparedness training with staff and disaster contingency planning. CMS published the final version of the new Appendix Z of Medicare’s State Operations Manual online, and state surveyors will use newly created E-tags to score deficiencies and expectations set in it.

 

George Mills is leaving The Joint Commission

The Joint Commission confirmed Thursday afternoon that a key figure in standards interpretation for the healthcare accrediting organization will be departing this fall.

George Mills, MBA, FASHE, CEM, CHFM, CHSP, who has served as director of the organization’s engineering department for the past six years, will leave his post effective October 9. Mills has been with The Joint Commission for 14 years.

“During his tenure he has served as an advocate for healthcare organizations as they strive to improve the quality and safety of their physical environments,” a spokesperson for The Joint Commission said in an email.

The confirmation came after HCPro’s resident hospital safety expert, Steve MacArthur, safety consultant for The Greeley Company, blogged Thursday on murmurings of an impending Mills exit. The Joint Commission also confirmed MacArthur’s report that John D. Maurer, SASHE, CHFM, CHSP, will take over as acting director of engineering on an interim basis.

“I don’t anticipate that this will engender a significant change in how business will be conducted, including the practical administration of the Life Safety portion of the accreditation survey process,” MacArthur wrote, noting that he has always found Maurer to be “thoughtful, helpful, and equitable.”

Beginning October 9, Maurer will serve as acting director while a search for Mills’ successor is undertaken, the spokesperson said. Mills declined Thursday to comment on his forthcoming departure, and Maurer could not be reached.

 

Joint Commission deletes ORYX standard

The Joint Commission will delete performance improvement standard PI.02.01.03 and its single element of performance on January 1, 2018. The standard had required facilities to receive a composite performance rate of 85% or higher on the ORYX accountability measures.

The accreditor announced that it was deleting the standard because it wasn’t possible for facilities to accurately calculate their composite rates.

So many chart-based measures were retired to maintain alignment with CMS that there weren’t enough left relevant to this requirement. Also, since hospitals can submit data in several different ways, it threw off the composite rate calculations.

https://www.jointcommission.org/assets/1/18/Baking_Deletion_Prepublication.pdf

The measure had been suspended since 2015.