December 06, 2018 | | Comments 0
Print This Post
Email This Post

Suicides and drugs cut U.S. life expectancy

U.S. life expectancy dropped to 78.6 years in 2017, according to the CDC, with the main culprits of the decline being drug overdoses and suicides. The research shows that a baby born in 2017 had 1.2 months shaved off its life expectancy compared to one born 12 months earlier.  This is the third year in a row where life expectancy has declined.

“Life expectancy gives us a snapshot of the nation’s overall health and these sobering statistics are a wakeup call that we are losing too many Americans, too early and too often, to conditions that are preventable,” CDC director Robert Redfield, MD said in a public statement.

The CDC release three reports on November 28—one on suicide mortality, one on drug overdose deaths, and one on mortality overall. And while healthcare organizations have been working hard to treat, prevent, and respond to these issues, the CDC’s numbers show that more work is to be done.

In 2017 there was a grand total of 2.8 million deaths— 69,000 more than the prior year and the most deaths in one year since the government started recording over a century ago. Of those deaths 70,237 were due to drug overdoses and 47,000 were suicides.

Drug overdoses

The spike in drug addiction and deaths was rapid and devastating for many. Drug overdose deaths have increased 16% per year since 2014 says the CDC. And between 2016 and 2017 that number grew 9.6% to 21.7 deaths per 100,000. So far 20 states and the District of Columbia have overdose death rates higher than the national average, and eight have rates comparable to the national average.

Drug Overdoses Statistics

  • The rate of drug overdose deaths in 2017 was 21.7 per 100,000. That’s 3.6 times what it was in 1999 (6.1).
  • While drug use increased in all age groups, overdose rates were much higher for those aged 25–34 (38.4 per 100,000), 35–44 (39.0), and 45–54 (37.7)
  • Men are more likely to die of an overdose than women
  • The number of drug overdoses caused by synthetic opioids increased 45% between 2016 and 2017.

Suicide

As we’ve written about before, suicide has been the 10th leading cause of death since 2008, with suicide rates on the rise. There’s no single identifiable cause for the increase, though some suggest better reporting, a lack of accessible mental healthcare, economic stresses, and social isolation have played a role.

CMS and other healthcare organizations have made efforts in recent years to reduce ligature risks and patient suicides—new ligature regulations, resources and training, etc. Just on November 28, The Joint Commission released a new R3 report on improving suicide care.

Additional research has shown that many suicide victims visit a healthcare provider in the months leading up to the act. And screening programs, ligature risk checklists for patient rooms, and safety planning for after discharge have been shown to be effective.

Suicide Statistics

  • The CDC report says that between 1999 and 2017 the age-adjusted suicide rate rose 33%, up to 14 deaths per 100,000 from 10.5
  • In 2017 47,000 people died by suicide and 1.3 million made a suicide attempt
  • The number of suicides committed by women (9.7 per 100,000) is lower than for men (22.4). However, suicide rates for women have been growing rapidly and is up 53% since 1999
  • Suicide rates increased for men of every age except those aged 75 and older. However, men in this age group still commit suicide far more often than any other (39.7)
  • Suicides are more common in rural counties (20) than in urban ones (11.1). Between 1999 and 2017, suicide rates for rural areas increase 53%. Meanwhile the rate only grew 16% for urban areas.

 

Entry Information

Filed Under: National NewsPatient SafetyQuality

About the Author: Brian Ward is an Associate Editor at HCPro working on accreditation, patient safety, and quality news.

RSSPost a Comment  |  Trackback URL

*