July 28, 2017 | | Comments 0
Print This Post
Email This Post

Joint Commission: Half of blood transfusions are unnecessary and cost millions  

Hospitals could save more than $1 million per year by eliminating unnecessary red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, according to a new study. Blood transfusions are the most frequently performed hospital procedure in the country and costs $1,000 per unit of blood. Transfusions also come with potential health risks like allergic reactions, fever, and iron overload.

A study in the August 2017 issue of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety found that RBC transfusions have increased 134% between 1997 to 2011. However, 50% of them may be unnecessary, costing each hospital an average $1 million per year.

“The cost and risks of RBC transfusions, along with evidence of overuse, suggest that improving transfusion practices is a key opportunity for health systems to improve both the quality and value of patient care,” the study’s authors wrote. “Excessive transfusions have been identified as an improvement priority in the Choosing Wisely lists of wasteful practices by six professional organizations, including obstetric, hematology, critical care, and anesthesiology societies, and the Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM), and reducing excessive transfusion is the subject of an SHM-Society for the Advancement of Blood Management improvement guide. The Joint Commission, the AABB, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services have recognized the importance of improving blood management.”

The study looked at ways to reduce unnecessary blood transfusions as well; these include educational tools, real-time clinical decision supports to reduce unnecessary blood products and costs, providing information at point-of-care to inform decisions about a patient’s care, and enhancing health systems’ computerized provider order entry system. By using these methods, test hospitals were able to decrease RBC transfusions per 1,000 patient days from 90-78% during the study to 72.1% following the interventions.

Entry Information

Filed Under: Patient SafetyQuality

Tags:

Brian Ward About the Author: Brian Ward is an Associate Editor at HCPro working on accreditation news.

RSSPost a Comment  |  Trackback URL

*