June 02, 2017 | | Comments 0
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Joint Commission comments on proposed CMS transparency rule

The Joint Commission has made a public comment regarding CMS’ proposed rule to require accrediting organizations (AO) to make their survey reports publicly available. The Joint Commission is opposed to sharing private survey reports and thinks making the reports public will harm patient care.

Currently, AOs like The Joint Commission and DNV aren’t required to make their survey reports or plans of corrections (PoC) available to the public. Under the proposed rule, AOs would have to post these on their websites. 

“Access to survey reports and PoCs will enable health care consumers, in addition to Medicare beneficiaries, to make a more informed decision regarding where to receive health care thus encouraging health care providers to improve the quality of care and services they provide,” CMS wrote in the proposal memo. If you want to read and comment on the proposed rule, you can find a copy of the memo and commenting instructions here. CMS will accept comments until June 13.

In an open letter to CMS, Joint Commission President and CEO Mark R. Chassin, MD, FACP, MPP, MPH, wrote that while the accreditor is a strong supporter of transparency, it believes revealing all accreditation survey reports to the public is a bad idea. The crux of the issue is that the contents of those survey reports are meant as tools for hospitals to improve. It’s not the same as healthcare quality data, a distinction that may be lost on the public.

“As an organization whose mission is to support quality improvement and patient safety and inspire excellence, we believe the proposal will have significant detrimental consequences on our nation’s ability to continually improve the delivery of health care services,” he writes. “To be clear, this opposition is not one against transparency, but one of creating the right balance between useful, publicly available information and improving the quality and safety of healthcare.”

Some of the Joint Commission’s concerns are:

  • It’ll be harder to get AOs and healthcare organizations to collaborate on patient safety and continuous quality improvement.Having AOs release collected information would make providers less candid about their weaknesses and create an adverse dynamic that will ultimately, there will be increased patient harm and lower quality.
  • It will stunt AO’s efforts to create new standards or raise compliance standards for existing requirements.
  • Healthcare organizations will be incentivized to use AOs that report on the least number of Medicare-comparable standards. This will spur a race to the bottom on quality and may also cause a growth in the number of non-accredited facilities that’ll be surveyed at taxpayer expense and with fewer oversight visits.
  • The proposal will diminish the value of accreditation as a way to motivate healthcare organizations to excel.
  • The proposal will increase costs for AOs and healthcare organizations.

Entry Information

Filed Under: AccreditationJoint Commission Changes

Brian Ward About the Author: Brian Ward is an Associate Editor at HCPro working on accreditation news.

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