July 27, 2016 | | Comments 0
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Congress proposes delaying CMS star ratings for a year

Congress introduced a new bill yesterday that would force CMS to delay the release of its hospital star rating system by a year. The bill, the Hospital Quality Rating Transparency Act of 2016, would also require that a third party analyze CMS’ methodology and data and provide a 60-day comment period for interested parties.

The star ratings are determined by 62 quality measurements and are meant to be a simple, comprehensive look at hospital quality to help consumers make their medical choices. The ratings have come under fire by several hospital organizations who say that the ratings don’t show true quality and that the methodology CMS uses is flawed. One of these groups, the American Hospital Association, applauded Congress’s efforts to delay the ratings.

“Hospitals and members of Congress are in agreement: CMS can do better,” they wrote. “The majority of Congress—60 members of the Senate and more than 225 members of the House—asked CMS to delay and improve upon the star ratings. Our own analysis of preliminary data continues to raise questions and concerns about the methodology, which may unfairly penalize teaching hospitals and those serving the poor.

“We continue to urge CMS to work with hospitals and health systems to provide patients with a rating system that accurately reflects the quality of care provided at their facilities, and will work with Reps. [James] Renacci [R-OH] and [Kathleen] Rice [D-NY] to move this legislation forward.”

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Filed Under: CMSNational News

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About the Author: Brian Ward is an Associate Editor at HCPro working on accreditation, patient safety, and quality news.

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