March 09, 2016 | | Comments 0
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Drug-resistant bacteria on the rise

First, the good news. Between 2008 and 2014 there was a 50% and 9% drop in central line-associated bloodstream infections at short-term care (STC) facilities and long-term acute care (LTAC) facilities, respectively. Surgical site infection rates are also down by 17% in STC facilities, while LTAC facilities saw a 11% decline in catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

Now the bad news. Even as hospitals reduce hospital-acquired infections (HAI), there have been more cases of antibiotic-resistant (AR) bacteria. A new Vital Signs report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that one in seven HAIs at a STC facility is caused by an AR infection. At LTAC facilities, there’s a one in four chance that an HAI is caused by a AR infection.

“The good news is that we are preventing healthcare-acquired infections, which has saved thousands of lives,” said Patrick Conway, MD, CMS deputy administrator and chief medical officer said in a statement. “The challenge ahead is how we help to prevent antibiotic resistance, as well as infections. We are using incentives, changes in care delivery, and transparency to improve safety and quality for patients.”

Two million Americans contract AR infections annually, with 23,000 dying because of their infections. There are six bacteria causing the most concern, with a significant percentage of each becoming drug-resistant:

  1. 6% of Acinetobacter species are multidrug-resistant
  2. 9% of Staphylococcus aureus isolates are methicillin-resistant
  3. 5% of Enterococci are vancomycin-resistant
  4. 8% of Enterobacteriaceae are extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing.
  5. 9% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are multidrug-resistant
  6. 6% of Enterobacteriaceae are carbapenem-resistant

“For clinicians, prevention means isolating patients when necessary,” said report author Clifford McDonald, MD, in the release. “It also means being aware of antibiotic resistance patterns in your facilities, following recommendations for preventing infections that can occur after surgery or from central lines and catheters placed in the body, and prescribing antibiotics correctly.”

The CDC encourages the healthcare community to continue to focus on preventing HAIs by stronger adherence to existing best practices.  The agency has also come up with a new web app that allows users can make customizable, interactive maps and tables with regional, state and national on HAIs caused by AR bacteria.

 

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Filed Under: CDCPatient Safety

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About the Author: Brian Ward is an Associate Editor at HCPro working on accreditation, patient safety, and quality news.

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