February 17, 2011 | | Comments 0
Print This Post
Email This Post

Hospitals failing on communication compliance

Two former language-expert hospital administrators in conjunction with Language Line Services have released a new report called “The New Joint Commission Standards for Patient-Centered Care,” that finds hospitals are falling short of The Joint Commission’s language access requirements for patients with limited English.

The requirements were announced in 2009, and  put in place on January 1 of this year, but won’t have an effect on accreditation during the year-long pilot phase.

According to the report and The Joint Commission,  communication breakdowns are the cause for nearly 3,000 deaths every  year, and the majority of these breakdowns involve patients with limited English. Studies show that 50 million people speak a language other than English in the home, and according to the report, some hospitals are not making the connection between language services, patient rights, and patient safety.

The report also says that hospitals may think they are being compliant because they have bilingual staff, contract interpreters, and over-the-phone or video interpreters, but the standards require proof of interpreter training and fluency competence for interpreters in spoken languages as well as American Sign Language  for deaf and hard-of-hearing patients.

The report says hospitals that aren’t in compliance with the new regulations could do damage to their reputations and accrue untold expenses.

Visit The Joint Commission’s Hospital, Language, and Culture website for more information.

Entry Information

Filed Under: Joint Commission Changes

Tags:

Jackie Zagami About the Author: Jaclyn Beck is the associate director of the Association for Healthcare Accreditation Professionals (AHAP) where she manages AHAP Accreditation Connection, the annual AHAP conference, and contributes to the monthly publication Briefings on The Joint Commission.

RSSPost a Comment  |  Trackback URL

*