March 13, 2009 | | Comments 5
Print This Post
Email This Post

Win a free registration to AHAP ’09

In an effort to make this year’s AHAP Conference as accessible and fun as possible, we’ve decided to run a contest–and each week, we’ll hold a drawing for a free registration to the conference! All you have to do to enter is submit a Tip of the Day for the AHAP Blog.

The rules are simple: write up an accreditation-related tip on the topic of your choosing-a tool you’d like to share with other AHAP members, a story about a recent survey, a short post about how you’ve improved staff education on infection control or how you’re meeting a National Patient Safety Goal, for example. Simply email your tip to me at mphillion@hcpro.com. I’ll post it to the blog as each entry arrives, and you’ll be entered to win a weekly drawing for registration to the conference!

We’ll announce the winners each Friday morning. The contest will run through Friday, April 24th. Questions? Feel free to email me for details. Looking forward to hearing from you!

Entry Information

Filed Under: Annual Conference

Tags:

About the Author: Matt Phillion is the director of the Association for Healthcare Accreditation Professionals and a Senior Managing Editor at HCPro, Inc., where he is the editor of the monthly publication Briefings on The Joint Commission.

RSSComments: 5  |  Post a Comment  |  Trackback URL

  1. LD.04.03.07 Patients with comparable needs receive the same standard of care, treatment and services throughout the hospital.

    If your organization provides an educational service in a classroom setting Monday through Friday but not on the week ends make sure that the educational content is the same for patients who require the service on week-ends. The service must always be, even in the classroon setting, based on individual needs and assessment. If asked, why the classroom setting…the appropriate response would be to to educate a larger number simultaneously but each lesson is tailored to individual assessments and needs. patients receive the same content based on identified needs no matter what setting the education takes place in.

  2. We utilize our internal hospital intranet to publish many “happenings” and “hot spots” associated with continued readiness. We have the National Patient safety Goals posted; I write a monthly regulatory newsletter that is posted here; we have a multiple choice regulatory question of the week…staff can answer the question and will get the rationale for the correct answer; we post all tracer results here as well. This allows all units to view areas of good practice as well as areas needing improvement throughout the organization. One unit may excel in an area that can offer ideas to other departments. This information is open access for any and all hosptial employees to review. Managers use this for their monthly staff meeting regulatory awareness information.

  3. We’ve had great success with improving staff competence by conducting monthly mock codes. We are a 68-bed hospital, so resources are limited. The Nursing Educator indiscretly places a mannekin with an attached cardiac simulator in an empty patient bed, radiology table, or any place a code situation could occur. We lure an associate into the room and present the patient’s clinical scenerio. The associate initiates a “Code Blue” through an over-head page, just like the real thing. Associates assigned to the “code team” for the shift, Cardio-Pulmonary, Medical Staff, ACLS Nuring Anesthesia, and Laboratory all respond. The code progresses as the “patient’s” condition changes, as realistically as possible. We measure the success of the mock code using 13 pre-determined criteria, such as 1 min or less from call to CPR, room set up with ambu and suction, is a lead running the code, etc. When we started doing mock codes our compliance to the 13 indicators was 45%; today our compliance is 92%. In the beginning, the associates were apprehensive and reluctant to participate. Today the associates are confident and eagar to show off their skills.

  4. We’ve had great success with improving staff competence by conducting monthly mock codes. We are a 68-bed hospital, so resources are limited. The Nursing Educator indiscreetly places a mannequin with an attached cardiac simulator in an empty patient bed, radiology table, or any place a code situation could occur. We lure an associate into the room and present the patient’s clinical scenerio. The associate initiates a “Code Blue” through an over-head page, just like the real thing. Associates assigned to the “code team” for the shift, Cardio-Pulmonary, Medical Staff, ACLS Nursing, Anesthesia, and Laboratory all respond. The code progresses as the “patient’s” condition changes, as realistically as possible. We measure the success of the mock code using 13 pre-determined criteria, such as 1 min or less from call to CPR, room set up with ambu and suction, is a lead running the code, etc. When we started doing mock codes our compliance to the 13 indicators was 45%; today our compliance is 92%. In the beginning, the associates were apprehensive and reluctant to participate. Today the associates are confident and eagar to show off their skills.

  5. We improved staff education for infection control by making it fun! During International Infection Prevention Week our department hosted a POP (Protect our Patients) educational campaign. We made rounds throughout the hospital and distributed crossword puzzles and quizzes to all staff. Those that were able to complete them and turn them in received a tootsie pop. All completed quizzes/puzzles were submitted into a drawing at the end of the week for great prizes like free meals, gift certificates for manicures/pedicures, the movie theater and more. New badge holders were distributed that said “wash your hands” and static stickers were made with the same handwashing logo and placed in the patient rooms. On the final day of the POP campaign, we had a popcorn and movie day. We played a variety of infection control and patient safety videos throughout the day and served fresh popped popcorn. The final drawing was held at the end of the day and all were truly excited. We had great participation from all and got the message across. Thank you for the opportunity to share our story!

RSSPost a Comment  |  Trackback URL

*